Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Book Review: The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay


            A review of a book released in 2000 isn’t exactly timely, but I think the book is important to cover here nonetheless. I recently finished reading Michael Chabon’s The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (affiliate link), and it was fantastic. As a fan of comics, I was aware of the book when it was released, but somehow I didn’t get around to reading it until this year. Personally, I’m glad I waited.
            The book follows the exploits of two cousins, Sam Klayman (aka Clay) and Josef Kavalier, as they enter the comic book industry in New York City in 1939. As tensions rise in Europe leading up to World War II, they create a new character, The Escapist, that quickly rises in fame. The book follows the ups-and-downs of their careers and the twists-and-turns of their lives, and it’s a gripping, entertaining read.
            One of the aspects I enjoyed the most about the book was its near seamless blending of real world fact with fiction. Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, Stan Lee, and many other comic book greats inhabit the world of Kavalier & Clay, and the book draws many anecdotes from the era. The story arc of Kavalier & Clay and the ownership of their character draw many parallels to Siegel & Shuster and Superman. Additionally, one of the main turning points of the book involves the Superman lawsuits DC brought against Victor Fox (Wonder Man) and Fawcett (Captain Marvel). There is even a scene where Kavalier & Clay and a group of creators lock themselves in an apartment all weekend to create a 60-page comic book, echoing a similar tale involving Jerry Robinson, the co-creator of the Joker and Robin.
            As I said previously, I’m glad I waited 18 years before reading this book. Some of the nuances and references would have been lost on me had I read it when I was younger. Even so, it is an excellent book for anyone looking for a compelling story set during the golden age of comics.